How to Record a Voicemail That Converts Leads

As a salesperson, there’s no doubt that you regularly leave voicemails for prospects.

And while you may have a detailed plan in place for doing so, there could be a problem lurking — you’ve yet to record a voicemail of your own. 

Let’s break down the art of setting up a business voicemail that takes your place when you’re unavailable. 

Why You Need to Set Up Your Business Voicemail

There are three primary reasons for setting up a business voicemail.

  1. To engage your prospect: If you stick with the standard, out-of-the-box solution, your prospect may second guess if they dialed the right number. And that could lead them to hang up before leaving a message.
  2. It’s more professional: You can do whatever you want with your personal voicemail, but your business voicemail should be customized. This gives off a professional vibe that helps engage your prospect. 
  3. It’s another opportunity to sell: It’s not likely that you’ll close many, if any, deals via voicemail, but you still have the opportunity to provide information that will help you make a sale in the future.

Without a business voicemail, you’re missing out on all of this. And for that reason, it’s holding you back from reaching your full potential as a salesperson. 

Example Voicemail Greetings

Now that you know why it’s important to set up your business voicemail, there’s another question to answer: what should your greeting say?

There’s no perfect answer to this question, as it varies based on details such as what you’re selling, the length of the sales cycle, and your personal approach to connecting with prospects.

If you need a push in the right direction, here are five voicemail greetings designed to keep prospects interested. 

  1. Hi, this is [first_name] [last_name]. I am out of the office right now, but I would love to chat with you as soon as I can. Please leave the reason for your call and the best return number. You can expect to hear back from me ASAP. Thanks for your call.
  2. Hi, this is [first_name] [last_name] at [company_name]. I am currently unable to take your call, but if you leave your name and number I will get back to you as soon as possible. You can also text me at this number or send an email to [email_address]. Either way, I look forward to chatting with you soon.
  3. You have reached the voicemail of [first_name] [last_name] at [company_name]. I am unavailable to take your call right now, but please leave your name, number, and reason for the call. Thanks.
  4. Hi, this is [first_name] [last_name] at [company_name]. If you’re calling about [product_name], you’re in the right place. Please leave your name and call back number after the beep. Thanks for your time.
  5. Hello, this is [first_name] [last_name] and I am out of office until [date]. I want to chat with you as soon as possible, so please leave your name, number, the reason for the call, and the best time to reach out. I’ll get back to you upon my return to the office. Thanks for your time. 

Don’t Forget to Follow Up

Now that you have your new voicemail set up, it’s time to sit back and reap the fruits of your labor. But as noted above, your voicemail alone isn’t likely to close any deals. 

This is why it’s critical that you follow up. Here are some tips to guide you.

Listen to the voice message and take notes

As you receive voicemail leads, take detailed notes so you know who the prospect is, what they are looking for, and how to prepare for your conversation. This protects against coming off as uninformed. 

Act fast

Return the message as quickly as you can. Neglecting to do so can result in losing a sale to another company. 

For example, if you’re selling insurance or mortgage products, you have a lot of competition. There’s a good chance the prospect is speaking with other companies, so don’t delay. 

Apologize for missing their call

It’s common courtesy, so make sure you lead with this (along with your name and company) when you make your return call. 

Common Voicemail Mistakes

The advice above should help you record a voicemail that converts leads. However, it’s easy to make a mistake that could cost you sales. 

Some of the most common voicemail mistakes include the following. 

Too short

Don’t use something like “Hi, this is [first_name] [last_name]. Leave a message.” Concise is good, but this is abrupt. 

Too long

Don’t expect callers to listen to a long voicemail message. Too long can be just as bad as too short. Stick to the length in the examples above. 

Too personal

Unless it’s absolutely necessary, leave out the personal details. Callers don’t need to know that you’re vacationing in Hawaii or undergoing a tonsillectomy. 

Trial and Error

Just the same as a cold call or cold email script, it takes time and experimentation to settle on a voicemail that converts leads.

  • Start by recording a voicemail based on one of the examples above. 
  • Personally listen to the voicemail and re-record if necessary. Also, ask a colleague (or two) to listen and share feedback. 
  • From there, carefully chart voicemails, return calls, and closed leads. 
  • After a reasonable number of voicemails — such as 25 or 50 — crunch the numbers to determine how many leads you’ve closed and how many are still active.

Now, tweak your voicemail message and start the process over. After doing this three or four times, you’ll have a better idea of which approach is generating the most voicemail leads. 

Conclusion

As a salesperson, your job boils down to generating leads, conversing with prospects, and closing deals. For this reason, take advantage of every opportunity that’s available to you, including voicemail leads. 

You can’t answer every call, so it’s imperative to record a voicemail that engages prospects. It’s a simple step that can help you meet and exceed all your short and long-term sales goals. 

For more information on lead generation, contact the experts at Aged Lead Store

Photo by Jacob Townsend on Unsplash

About Chris Bibey

Chris Bibey is a freelance writer with 15+ years of experience in the insurance and finance industries. Clients include Sales Hacker, Outreach, Discover, PayChex, and Moran Insurance. He has also worked as Head of Sales for Verma Media.