10 Tips To Creating Great Telemarketing Scripts

December 13, 2010

Writing an effective and strong telemarketing script is the key to drawing business. The script should make customers comfortable, give them a good feeling about the product or service and it should drive them to desire it. This article will include ten helpful tips for writing such an effective script.

1. The first step should always be to ask for the person on the list. If someone answers, don’t assume its the right person. Be respectful and use titles such as “Mr.” or “Ms.”

2. Be courteous, but don’t overdo it. Instead of saying asking how the person is doing, make a statement, such as “I hope you’re doing well.” This keeps the conversation brief and doesn’t leave it open for a long story.

3. Write a short introduction, preferably less than 30 words. The consumer on the other end should always know the telemarketer’s name, company and the reason for calling.

4. When creating the reason for calling, don’t immediately state that a service or product is being sold. Just as a fisherman knows that a fish will bite a hook with a worm over a hook with no worm, keep in mind that a potential customer needs some bait also. Think of a creative way to engage their attention for the product or service offered.

5. Avoid scripted humor in all situations. Not every person has a sense of humor and neither does each employee. While the joke may sound good on paper, it may not translate as well through or to a person who doesn’t understand it.

6. Identify the attractive and useful features of the product or service. Using strong descriptive words and short concise sentences, write an appealing outline of each point to be included.

7. Have rebuttals ready for possible responses. Analyze the script and from the potential customer’s point of view, think of some opposing questions. To combat these questions, provide answers that rephrase the features or draw attraction to a different product or service.

8. Include questions asking the potential customer if he or she understood the offer and has any questions.

9. Provide a “last chance” offer. If there are possible discounts, now is the time to offer them. If not, word this part similar to a redirecting rebuttal.

10. In closing, whether there was a sale or not, write a sentence or two thanking the person for their valuable time.

About Troy Wilson